Community Defibrillator Handover

PUPILS TRY TO SAVE LIVES AND CHALLENGE PRESTON BUSINESSES AND ORGANISATIONS TO DO THE SAME

On 12th June 2018, the Deputy Mayor of Preston officially received the school defibrillator on behalf of the community of Fulwood when our pupils made their defibrillator available to anyone in an emergency.  The pupils have raised over £500 to save lives and issued a challenge to Preston businesses and organisations to follow their example.

Our raised over £500 for an external housing unit for the school’s defibrillator (defib.).

The pupils raised money by selling tea towel, popcorn stalls, drink sales, pens and pencils sales and a non-uniform day.   When the pupils realised the unit needed professionally fitting, they started to think of other ways to raise the extra money needed, but Rob from Ashton Joinery rose to the challenge when he told the pupils he would fit the housing unit for free enabling the unit to be accessible to the pupil sooner than they thought.

Earlier this year Martin Blackburn from Albany Training set the challenge for the pupils to raise the funds to make the unit accessible for all and in return he would teach the Year 6 pupils how to save a life with basic CPR training. 

It is a “life skill” for primary school children to learn First Aid.  St Pius believe you are never too young to help other people.

A defibrillator machine is used to restart the heart with an electric shock by pads attached to the chest.  St Pius’s machine will be housed in a new secure, vandal proof housing unit on the outside of the school building on Garstang Road.  In an emergency, when a member of the public dials 999, they will be given an access code and talked through how to use the machine.

A defibrillator, a “defib” or an external defibrillator (AED) can mean the difference between life and death for a heart attack victim. Defibrillation within two-three minutes of an attack gives an 80% better chance of survival.  For every minute’s delay they lose between 7% and 10% chance of survival, so early intervention can make a massive difference.

Because of the urgency of immediate treatment whilst waiting for an ambulance, a defibrillator only has a use within about 500m of the victim.  Hence the challenge to anyone with an internal machine to get it outside where it can benefit a neighbourhood.

So come on Preston, can you do what some Primary School children have done, and help save lives?  The school would love to hear if you have taken up their challenge.